Category Archives: Uncategorized

1835 – Mary Shelley’s Lodore



Instead of reading Mary Shelley’s 900-page fifth novel, Lodore, save yourself some time and listen to our episode on it! We’ll provide you with the highlights, including a glimpse into the 38-year-old widow’s possibly queer relationships with other women.

Sources:
Mary Shelley, Lodore. http://www.gutenberg.net.au/ebooks06/0606381h.html
Graham Allen, Mary Shelley: https://www.macmillanihe.com/page/detail/?sf1=barcode&st1=9780230019089
Virginia Bracket, Critical Companion to Mary Shelley: http://www.infobasepublishing.com/Bookdetail.aspx?ISBN=0816081239
Anne K. Mellor, Mary Shelley: Her Life, Her Fiction, Her Monsters: https://www.routledge.com/Mary-Shelley-Her-Life-Her-Fiction-Her-Monsters-1st-Edition/Mellor/p/book/9780415901475

Music:
“Brandenburg Concerto no. 4” by Johann Sebastian Bach, performed by Kevin MacLeod
“Fiddles McGinty” by Kevin MacLeod
“B – Somber Ballads” by Kevin MacLeod

This episode features the voices of Steven Nelson and Mary Shelly. Our associate producer is Paula Matzke.

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1834 – The Death of Samuel Taylor Coleridge



On the year of his death, we look at the life and work of one of the founders of British Romanticism, Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

Sources:
Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Biographia Literaria: https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/6081
Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Complete Poetical Workshttps://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/29090
Thomas DeQuincey, Confessions of an English Opium-Eaterhttps://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/2040
John Polidori, “Extract of a Letter from Geneva” (the introduction to The Vampyre): https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/6087
William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Lyrical Balladshttps://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/9622

Music:
Aaron Kenny, “Desert Caravan”
Kevin MacLeod, “Lord of the Land”
Kevin MacLeod, “Gagool”
Kevin MacLeod, “Lightless Dawn”

This episode features the voices of Steven Nelson and Curtis Matzke. Our associate producer is Paula Matzke.

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And follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/frank_after


1833 – Mary Shelley’s The Mortal Immortal



In this episode, you can hear Mary Shelley’s short story, “The Mortal Immortal,” presented in its entirety.

This story was originally published in the 1833 issue of The Keepsake, a literary annual to which Mary Shelley contributed many stories and poems over the years. “The Mortal Immortal” is arguably her most famous short story.

Did you enjoy the way we changed up the format for this episode? Let us know on social media!
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1832 – The Invention of Science (and Science Fiction)



Why do we call Mary Shelley the inventor of science fiction? And why does it matter? We’ll explore those questions and also talk about what they have to do with The Royal Society of London, The British Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Anatomy Act of 1832.

Sources:
James Gunn (ed.), The Road to Science Fiction: https://www.amazon.com/Road-Science-Fiction-Gilgamesh-Scarecrow/dp/0810844141
Francis Bacon, Novum Organumhttps://www.gutenberg.org/files/45988/45988-h/45988-h.htm
Francis Bacon, The New Atlantishttps://www.gutenberg.org/files/2434/2434-h/2434-h.htm
Margaret Cavendish, The Blazing Worldhttps://digital.library.upenn.edu/women/newcastle/blazing/blazing.html
David Cahan, From Natural Philosophy to the Sciences: Writing the History of Nineteenth-Century Sciencehttps://www.press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/F/bo3644079.html

Music:
“The Boy Got Skills” by Max McFerren
“Dreaming in 432Hz” by Unicorn Heads
“Fiddles McGinty” by Kevin MacLeod
“The Theatrical Poster for Poltergeist III” by Chris Zabriskie

This episode features the voices of Steven Nelson and Mary Shelly.

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Bonus – Eric Molinsky’s Imaginary Worlds



In our previous episode, I played an excerpt from Sawbones: A Marital Tour of Misguided Medicine, in which the hosts discussed the history of the man who may have inspired the creation of Frankenstein. This week I offer, in its entirety, an episode of Eric Molinsky’s podcast, Imaginary Worlds, titled “The Year Without a Summer.” This episode, which originally aired in 2016, delves into the circumstances behind the famous writing competition between Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Lord Byron, and John Polidori.

Imaginary Worlds is part of the Midroll podcasting network. You can find it online at https://www.imaginaryworldspodcast.org/home.html, and you can subscribe to it wherever podcasts are streamed.

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Bonus – My Hideous Progeny



In this episode, I discuss the background of this podcast and play an excerpt from an episode of one of my favorite podcasts, Sawbones: A Marital Tour of Misguided Medicine. The episode, “The (Maybe) Real Dr. Frankenstein,” was one of the inspirations for this show.

Sawbones is part of the Maximum Fun podcasting network. You can find it online at https://www.maximumfun.org/shows/sawbones, and you can subscribe to it wherever podcasts are streamed.

This episode also featured the voice of Paula Matzke.

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Bonus – Rachel Feder’s Harvester of Hearts



In this bonus episode, I interview Rachel Feder, the author of Harvester of Hearts: Motherhood under the Sign of Frankenstein.

Harvester of Hearts is published by Northwestern University Press: http://www.nupress.northwestern.edu/content/harvester-hearts

Rachel can be found at: https://www.rachelfeder.com/

The edition of Mary Shelley’s Mathilda that we discuss in the episode, edited by Michelle Faubert and published by Broadview Press, can be found here: https://broadviewpress.com/product/mathilda/?ph=520e08a63daa08ffebfa06f6#tab-description


1831 – Revisions



Frankenstein was revised several times in the early years of its rise to fame–by Percy Shelley, by William Godwin, and, in 1831, by Mary herself.

Sources:
A collation of the 1818 and 1831 editions of Frankenstein from the University of Pennsylvania: http://knarf.english.upenn.edu/Colv1/ftitle.html
The manuscript of Frankenstein at the Shelley-Godwin Archive: http://shelleygodwinarchive.org/contents/frankenstein/
Anne K. Mellor, “Revising Frankenstein”: http://knarf.english.upenn.edu/Articles/mellor9.html
E.B. Murray, “Changes to the 1823 edition of Frankenstein“: http://knarf.english.upenn.edu/Articles/murray.html
E.B. Murray, “Shelley’s contributions to Frankenstein“: http://knarf.english.upenn.edu/Articles/murray2.html
Blog post on Theodore von Holst’s illustration of Frankensteinhttps://romanticillustrationnetwork.com/2016/11/26/image-of-the-month-theodore-von-holst-frankenstein-1831/

Music:
“Dreaming in 432Hz” by Unicorn Heads
“Cold Funk” by Kevin MacLeod
“Mesmerize” by Kevin MacLeod
“The Theatrical Poster for Poltergeist III” by Chris Zabriskie

This episode features the voices of Curtis Matzke, Steven Nelson, and Mary Shelly.

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And follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/frank_after


1830 – Mary Shelley’s The Fortunes of Perkin Warbeck



Nobody ever really talks about Mary Shelley’s later novels. There’s a reason for that.

Sources:
Mary Shelly, The Fortunes of Perkin Warbeck
Erin L Webster Garrett, “The politics of ambivalence: romance, history, and gender in Mary W. Shelley’s Fortunes of Perkin Warbeck.” CLIO, vol. 37, no. 1, 2007. http://link.galegroup.com.proxy.lib.umich.edu/apps/doc/A174818260/AONE.

Music:
“Fiddles McGinty” by Kevin MacLeod
“Wave in the Atmosphere” by Dan Lebowitz
“Lord of the Land” by Kevin MacLeod
“Touching Moment” by Wayne Jones
“I Am a Man Who Will Fight for Your Honor” by Chris Zabriskie

This episode features the voices of Steven Nelson and Mary Shelly.

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1829 – Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s Faust



Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s novel, The Sorrows of Werther, is one of the most important texts in the romanticist movement, and is one of only three books with which Frankenstein’s creature learns how to read, alongside Plutarch’s Lives and Paradise Lost. But it’s not even the most interesting of Goethe’s books to put up alongside Frankenstein. Come sign this contract and listen to the story of Goethe’s Faust.

Sources:
Goethe, The Sorrows of Wertherhttps://www.gutenberg.org/files/2527/2527-h/2527-h.htm
Goethe, Faust Parts I and IIhttps://www.poetryintranslation.com/PITBR/German/Fausthome.php
The English Faust Book of 1592: https://books.google.com/books?id=oCsTAAAAQAAJ&dq=editions%3A4xkVCT46NXQC&pg=PR1#v=onepage&q&f=false
Christopher Marlowe, The Tragical History of Doctor Faustushttps://www.gutenberg.org/files/779/779-h/779-h.htm

Music:
“Dreams Become Real” by Kevin MacLeod
“Undercover Vampire Policeman” by Chris Zabriskie
“Me and the Devil” by Robert Johnson

Audio clips:
The Twilight Zone, Season 4 Episode 9, “Printer’s Devil”. Written by Charles Beaumont, directed by Ralph Senensky, and starring Robert Sterling and Burgess Meredith.
The Simpsons, Season 5, Episode 4, “Treehouse of Horror IV”. Written by Greg Daniels and Dan McGrath, directed by David Silverman, and starring Dan Castellaneta and Harry Shearer.

This episode features the voices of Steven Nelson and Mary Shelly.

Please like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/FrankAfter/
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