1828 – The Burke and Hare murders



In 1828, Edinburgh University was the premier institution of medical science in the English speaking world. That created a demand for dead bodies to be dissected. Two enterprising Irish immigrants, William Burke and William Hare, saw an opportunity to go into business, and so became the United Kingdom’s first celebrity serial killers.

Sources:
The story of Burke and Hare is adapted from Lisa Rosner’s The Anatomy Murders, published by The University of Pennsylvania press in 2010: http://www.upenn.edu/pennpress/book/14677.html
The short stories “Some Terrible Letters from Scotland,” “The Red Man,” “Post-Mortem Reflections of a Medical Lecturer,” and “The Victim” are all collected in The Vampyre and Other Tales of the Macabre, published by Oxford University Press in 2008: https://global.oup.com/ukhe/product/the-vampyre-and-other-tales-of-the-macabre-9780199552412
The trailer for John Landis’s 2010 film, Burke and Hare can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UE7KvAyVnbw

Music:
“The Graveyard” by Loyalty Freak Music
“Cold Funk” by Kevin MacLeod
“Ambiment” by Kevin MacLeod

This episode features the voices of Steven Nelson and Mary Shelly, and Andrew Ramsay as Sir Walter Scott. Andrew can be found at 5by12films.com

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And follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/frank_after


1827 – Jane Webb’s The Mummy!



Much like Mary Shelley, Jane Webb was a teenager mourning a death in her family when she decided to write her first novel. And much like Frankenstein, that novel laid the foundation for many features of science fiction. But The Mummy! is more than just an imitation…

Sources:
Jane Webb Loudon, The Mummy! unabridged from Project Gutenberg: https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/56426
Jane Webb Loudon, The Mummy! edited and with an introduction by Alan Rauch: https://www.amazon.com/Mummy-Twenty-Second-Century-Arbor-Paperbacks/dp/0472065742/ref=sr_1_1
Bruce Ware Allen, “Jane Webb Loudon” in A History Bloghttp://ahistoryblog.com/2012/07/24/jane-webb-loudon-1807-1858/
SJ Chambers, “The Corpse of the Future” in Clarkesworldhttp://clarkesworldmagazine.com/chambers_12_12/

Music:
“Shattered Paths” by Aakash Gandhi
We Always Thought the Future Would Be Kind of Fun” by Chris Zabriskie
“Impending Boom” by Kevin MacLeod
“Cold Funk” by Kevin MacLeod
“I Am a Man Who Will Fight for Your Honor” by Chris Zabriskie

This episode features the voices of Curtis Matzke and Ellie Schwartz.

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And follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/frank_after


1826 – Henry Milner’s Frankenstein; or, the Man and the Monster!



Three years after Richard Brinsley Peake’s Presumption, Henry M. Milner wrote a play that might be the greatest stage adaptation of Frankenstein in the entire nineteenth century. And he accomplished it by ignoring virtually everything that Peake had done – and virtually everything that Mary Shelley had done.

Sources:
Henry M. Milner, Frankenstein; or, The Man and the Monster!www.searchengine.org.uk/ebooks/37/14.pdf
“TP Cooke in Paris” on Frankensteinia: The Frankenstein Blogfrankensteinia.blogspot.com/2011/12/
“Demon of Switzerland and The Man and the Monster” in Romantic Circleswww.rc.umd.edu/editions/frankenstein/Pop/manmonster
“H.M. Milner” in Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley: An Academic Wikimary-shelley.wikia.com/wiki/H._M._Milner,_Frankenstein;_or,_The_Man_and_the_Monster_(1826)

Music:
“Cold Funk” by Kevin MacLeod
“Sicilian Breeze” by Topher Mohr and Alex Elena
“Comfortable Mystery by Kevin MacLeod
“Light Thought” by Kevin Macleod
“Secret Second Earth” by the 129ers

This episode features the voices of Paula Matzke and Curtis Matzke. Curtis can be found at www.unfurnishedfilms.com/.

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And follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/frank_after


1825 – Mary Shelley’s The Last Man



Mary Shelley’s third book was also her only other science fiction novel, the apocalyptic The Last Man.

Sources:
Mary Shelley, The Last Man (Oxford World Classics): https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-last-man-9780199552351?q=the%20last%20man&lang=en&cc=us
This episode features an audio clip from The Walking Dead season 5 episode 10, “Them.” Written by Heather Bellson, directed by Julius Ramsay, and starring Andrew Lincoln (AMC).
The reviews of The Last Man quoted in this episode can be found at Romantic Circles: https://www.rc.umd.edu/reference/chronologies/mschronology/reviews.html#Last

Music:
“Dreams Become Real” by Kevin MacLeod: https://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1500027
“I Am a Man Who Will Fight for Your Honor” by Chris Zabriski: http://chriszabriskie.com/honor/

This episode features the voices of Steven Nelson and Mary Shelly.

Please like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FrankAfter/
And follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/frank_after


1824 – Mary Shelley’s Valperga



With her second published novel, Mary Shelley crafted an historical novel based on Dante, Boccaccio, and Machiavelli, and in so doing she took on works by Sir Walter Scott, Lord Byron, and Napoleon Bonaparte. Find out all about Valperga: or, The Life and Adventures of Castruccio, Prince of Lucca.

Sources:
Mary Shelley, Valperga (Oxford World Classics): https://global.oup.com/academic/product/valperga-or-the-life-and-adventures-of-castruccio-prince-of-lucca-9780195108828?q=valperga&lang=en&cc=us
Review of Valperga in Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazinehttp://www.rc.umd.edu/reference/chronologies/mschronology/reviews/valpbw.html

This episode features the voices of Paula Matzke, Steven Nelson, and Mary Shelly.

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1823 – Richard Brinsley Peake’s Presumption



Out of the thousands of adaptations of Frankenstein that have been made over the years, there is only one that we have a record of Mary Shelley actually seeing: Richard Brinsley Peake’s Presumption; or, The Fate of Frankenstein.

Sources:
Jeffrey N. Cox (editor), Seven Gothic Dramas 1789-1825 (Ohio University Press): https://www.ohioswallow.com/book/Seven+Gothic+Dramas%2C+1789%E2%80%931825
Harold J. Nichols, “The Acting of Thomas Potter Cooke”: http://knarf.english.upenn.edu/Articles/nichols.html
Romantic Circles. “Novel into Drama and onto Stage”: http://www.rc.umd.edu/editions/peake/apparatus/drama.html

This episode features the voices of Steven Nelson and Mary Shelly as well as a very special appearance by Samuel Asimov Matzke.

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And follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/frank_after


1822 – William Blake, of the Devil’s Party



William Blake once said that John Milton was “of the Devil’s party without knowing it.” In this episode, we consider Milton’s Paradise Lost (1667), and its legacy among the Romantics, especially the poet and illustrator William Blake. To help me out, I interview my friend and colleague, Professor Rebecca Ariel Porte of the Brookings Institute for Social Research. This being a Skype interview, the audio quality is less than ideal, but it’s an illuminating discussion, touching on everything from the Devil’s revolutionary politics to my own expecting parenthood.

Music for this episode includes The Rolling Stones’ “Sympathy for the Devil” and “Killmonger Theme” from the Black Panther soundtrack.

Please like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FrankAfter/
And follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/frank_after


1821 – Walter Scott’s Ivanoe



The poet, the novelist, the chivalric romancer: in this episode, we consider the three careers of Edinburgh’s favorite literary son, Sir Walter Scott.

Source:
The Walter Scott Digital Archive: www.walterscott.lib.ed.ac.uk/home.html

If you enjoyed Andrew Ramsay as Sir Walter Scott, you can find him at: https://www.5by12films.com/
If you enjoyed Steven Nelson, you can check out his podcast at: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/diy-democracy/id1286579387?mt=2

Please like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FrankAfter/
And follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/frank_after


1820 – Percy Shelley’s Prometheus Unbound



Mary Shelley’s husband is credited as a significant influence on her work, and rightly so. But a close look at Prometheus Unbound and a few of Percy Shelley’s other major works shows that he and his wife differed in some important ways, particularly in their attitudes towards science and technological progress.

Sources:
Neil Fraistat and Donald H. Reiman (editors), Shelley’s Poetry and Prose (Norton Critical Editions): https://books.wwnorton.com/books/webad.aspx?id=10607
Jeremy Corbyn’s speech to the Glastonbury Festival: https://twitter.com/TheMurdochTimes/status/878739301449605121
This episode features an audio clip from Stranger Things season 1 episode 1, “The Vanishing of Will Byers,” written and directed by Matt and Ross Duffer (Netflix)

This episode features voice work from Mary Shelly, Steven Nelson, and Rebecca Adams Wright. Rebecca is a science fiction writer from Ypsilanti, Michigan. Find her at: https://radamswright.com/


1819 – John Polidori’s The Vampyre



Did you know that the precursor to Dracula originated out of the same storytelling competition as Frankenstein? And that neither story would have been written were it not for the worst climate disaster of the last millennium? And that the modern English vampire story began as a comment on the toxic masculinity of Lord Byron and his acquaintances?

Sources:
Robert Morrison and‎ Chris Baldick (editors), The Vampyre and Other Tales of the Macabre (Oxford World’s Classics): https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-vampyre-and-other-tales-of-the-macabre-9780199552412
Maddie Stone, “Rare Manuscript Exhibit Explores How Climate Change Disasters Create Monsters”: https://earther.com/rare-manuscript-exhibit-explores-how-climate-disasters-1820782944
The University of Iowa Libraries’ blog: https://blog.lib.uiowa.edu/speccoll/tag/frankenstein/

This episode features voice work from Paula Matzke, Mary Shelly, and Steven Nelson. Steven’s podcast, DIY Democracy, in which he tries to learn more about citizenship and improve civic engagement, can be found at: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/id1286579387